Disputes

Disputes (also known as chargebacks) are a challenging but inevitable part of e-commerce. They arise when a customer queries a transaction with their card issuer. The issuer creates a formal dispute which immediately reverses the payment, debiting your account for both the payment amount and a dispute fee (e.g., £15 for merchants in the United Kingdom).

It's important for you to monitor such disputes and respond to them as quickly as possible — thankfully, we've made the workflow simple.

Stages of a dispute

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Step 1: Payment charged back

A dispute results in a debit to your account, unless that payment has already been refunded (in which case we resolve it for you) or the issuer reverses the dispute (in which case you'll be repaid the disputed amount).

Step 2: Submit evidence

If you wish to argue your case, you need to submit evidence to us so that we can pass it on to the card scheme. It's best to respond to a dispute as soon as possible.

A dispute process may go through several statuses before it is resolved. For more information on each status, see our page on chargeback codes.

Step 3: Await the outcome

Once you've submitted your evidence, you'll have to wait up to 55 days for the issuing bank to make a decision.

Outcome A

  • If they accept your evidence, you will be credited back the disputed amount. Congratulations, you've won the dispute!

Outcome B

  • If they reject your evidence, you have lost the dispute. There are no further financial implications.

Dispute reasons and recommended evidence

There are several reasons a customer might dispute a payment, but the most common are fraudulent charges. The following section outlines all possible dispute reasons, as well as the type of evidence we recommend submitting to make your case. What you provide to us should be the most relevant evidence to the specific case.

Fraudulent

The customer claims they didn't authorize this payment. This can be the result of a lost or stolen card. It is not easy to win this kind of dispute and the evidence listed below is only relevant in specific cases. Sometimes, however, buyers simply forget about purchases they've made. So, if possible, try to contact the cardholder and ask them to withdraw their dispute.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Invoice / receipt
  • Customer communication

Unrecognized

The customer does not recognize this payment on their bank statement. Similar to fraudulent cases, the evidence below is relevant only for specific cases. Buyers occasionally forget about a purchase they've made, or they don't recognize your billing descriptor, so you could try to contact them and ask them to withdraw their dispute.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Invoice / receipt
  • Customer communication

Canceled subscription

The customer claims that they've been charged for a canceled subscription. It's possible they forgot about your cancellation policy and expected charges to be terminated. The cancellation policy can be a useful piece of evidence to provide here.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Terms and conditions / refund / cancellation policy
  • Recurring payment agreement

Product / service not received

The customer claims they never received the products they were charged for. In this case all evidence to prove that the buyer received the product or service can prove helpful.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Invoice / receipt
  • Customer communication

Not as described

The customer claims the item does not have the agreed features or is broken or damaged. Evidence that proves that the product/service provided was the agreed one would help in this matter.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Invoice / receipt
  • Customer communication
  • Terms and conditions / refund / cancellation policy
  • Description of service provided

Credit not issued

The customer claims that the product or service had been returned and no refund/credit was issued. If you have in fact refunded the customer, make sure to provide that evidence. If your customer was not eligible for a refund, you could provide your refund policy as evidence.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Invoice / receipt
  • Customer communication
  • Terms and conditions / refund / cancellation policy

Duplicate

The customer claims they have been charged more than once for the same purchase. Convincing evidence in this case would be proof that two separate products/services have been purchased.

  • Proof of delivery of goods or services
  • Proof showing two distinct payments

Incorrect amount

The customer claims that they have been charged the wrong amount. Indicating that the correct amount has been charged by providing the receipt or invoice would prove helpful. If available and relevant, any customer communication may also be of use.

  • Invoice/receipt
  • Customer communication
  • Terms and conditions / refund / cancellation policy

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Disputes


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